Archive for the ‘Golf Tips’ Category

Custom Fitting a Titleist 917 Driver

Oct 27th
2016

Why you need to get fit for your next driver… (Shared from GolfPunk)

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Buying a driver can be as simple as choosing the one that looks prettiest to you on the rack. But that’s just stupid. You should never buy a driver that isn’t custom fit for your game.

When that driver has as many options as the new Titleist 917 range, well, it becomes essential. With two heads, one in four loft options, one with three, three movable weight positions, three different weights options, 16 adjustable hosel positions, and four stock shafts each in at least two flexes, well it can’t be as simple as buying off the rack can it? We’re not great mathematicians, but that’s over 8000 different combinations, and that doesn’t include the many non up charge shafts options, nor the more exotic shafts you can pay extra for!  But wait, there’s more…

Callaway MD3 Gold Nickel Wedges – Going for gold

Jun 16th
2016

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Shared from GolfPunk

Forget the Olympics in Rio, Callaway are going for gold now! As of July 1st, the MD3 will be available in a luxurious gold nickel finish.

Crafted and shaped by Callaway’s Master Wedge Designer, Roger Cleveland, the new MD3 Milled Wedges offer a choice of three different grinds and a Progressive Groove Optimisation system which employs three different groove patterns to increase spin as loft increases. But wait, there’s more…

How the Summer Weather Affects Your Golf Ball’s Distance

Jun 2nd
2016

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Shared from 3Balls Golf Blog

Performance on the golf course varies depending on the outside air temperature and the storage condition of your golf balls. As the summer weather heats up, your golf balls and the distance they travel will be affected by the rising temperatures. There are a couple of things you should take into account before teeing up.

Outdoor Temperature

Air temperature affects the distance a golf ball will travel. When the air temperature increases in the summer, air density decreases. Less dense atmospheric conditions mean a golf ball will travel further in space. And if you think humidity will slow down ball speed then think again. Hot, humid Southern air decreases air density even more so you’ll produce even longer shots.

Golf Ball Temperature

As the outside air temperature increases, the density of the golf ball will decrease. A less dense golf ball will expand in high heat and fly further down range. You might think that a hotter golf ball will produce better results. However, if a golf ball gets too hot then it won’t perform as expected when it returns to room temperature. We don’t recommend leaving your golf balls in the trunk of your car on a hot summer day. But wait, there’s more…

What You Should Look for in a Used Golf Club

May 19th
2016

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Shared from 3Balls Golf Blog

What should you look for when it comes to buying a used online golf club? To tell you the truth, purchasing a used golf club is an easy process. Let us give you a couple of suggestions when it comes to shopping for used golf clubs on-line.

Tips for Buying Used Golf Clubs

First of all, there is going to be some wear and tear on a used golf club. And it’s perfectly fine if there are a few nicks and scratches on top of the club head. This is a cosmetic issue and it won’t affect performance.

On the other hand, if the club face has a dent or there is some damage, this will decrease its performance. We suggest staying away from clubs with defects on the club face because you won’t get the desired results.

Another consideration is the club’s shaft. If there are any dents in the shaft then you’ll want to avoid buying it. Some golf clubs are made out of graphite and there might be some paint that has been worn away. However, this won’t affect the performance either.

The last thing to look for in a used club is its grip. On most used golf clubs the grip will be worn from use. This isn’t a big deal because grips are easy to replace. A good company will ensure its grips are consistent or better than the overall club condition. But wait, there’s more

Golf Books #209 (Golf’s Strangest Rounds – Strangest series)

Nov 17th
2015

51JJh--2NCLGolf’s Strangest Rounds is an absorbing collection of bizarre tales from the lengthy annals of the sport’s history. There are stories of tragedy, eccentricity, tactical slipups and ones that defy categorization altogether—meet “Mysterious Montague,” for example, one of the world’s best golfers but a man who refused ever to compete in a tournament.

You’ll find plenty of golfing greats here—Gene Sarazen, Chip Beck, Greg Norman, Nick Faldo—all of whom have played their parts in irrational finishes, record rounds and famous freak shots. The tales within these pages are bizarre, fascinating, hilarious and, most importantly, true.

Publication date: June 1, 2016 (source)

About the Author

Andrew Ward is the creator of the Strangest series. His other titles include Bridge’s Strangest Hands and Cricket’s Strangest Matches.

Golf Books #127 (The Nine-Holer Guide: Scotland’s Nine-Hole Golf Courses)

Feb 4th
2014

The beautiful, quiet and often little known nine-hole golf courses offer even the lowest handicap golfer a challenge and with a level of difficulty rarely found on 18 hole courses it’s hardly surprising that there are even nine hole courses no one has ever played below par. (source)

Publication date: January 27, 2014

About the Author: Derek McAdam spent 20 years in financial journalism in the City but 1n 1976 he moved to Scotland where he purchased the Western Isles Hotel, Tobermory, a holiday resort hotel with its own nine-hole golf course. Now retired he continues to live in Tobermory and still regularly writes for both local and national newspapers.

He still enjoys a leisurely round on the beautiful Tobermory Golf Course and tours Scotland in his motorhome playing other nine-hole courses.

Golf Books #127 (The Nine-Holer Guide: Scotland's Nine-Hole Golf Courses)

Feb 4th
2014

The beautiful, quiet and often little known nine-hole golf courses offer even the lowest handicap golfer a challenge and with a level of difficulty rarely found on 18 hole courses it’s hardly surprising that there are even nine hole courses no one has ever played below par. (source)

Publication date: January 27, 2014

About the Author: Derek McAdam spent 20 years in financial journalism in the City but 1n 1976 he moved to Scotland where he purchased the Western Isles Hotel, Tobermory, a holiday resort hotel with its own nine-hole golf course. Now retired he continues to live in Tobermory and still regularly writes for both local and national newspapers.

He still enjoys a leisurely round on the beautiful Tobermory Golf Course and tours Scotland in his motorhome playing other nine-hole courses.

Learn to hit the ball lower

Jul 21st
2010

Many times we face difficult shots with wind. In a 100-metre shot our club selection under normal conditions would be 9-iron or pitching wedge.
What do you use if the wind is strong in your face?
If you use a 9-iron or pitching wedge the ball is going to spin back more and then fly higher in order to achieve the right distance.

The suggestion is, next time you face this shot, try playing a half swing with a 6 or 5-iron, gripping down the club with the same ball position. Gripping it short will make your swing narrower and that, combined with the degree of the clubface, will make your ball fly in a lower trajectory with less spin, so you will reach the distance with no trouble.

Try it…

Should we use lake balls?

Jul 1st
2010

Many golfers choose to save money by using lake balls rather than forking out for new ones they could lose after just one shot.
But buying lake balls can be a bit of a lottery if you’re not purchasing them from a reputable source.
You might well stumble upon the odd nearly-new Pro V1 or Srixon Z-Star, but on the other hand you could end up with a handful of Dunlop and Top Flite balls that could have been sat at the bottom of a freezing pond for months.

Buying lake balls has become increasingly popular with many golfers, especially in the recent economic climate.

The lake balls are also a benefit for many golf clubs, having their lakes cleared regularly by a lake ball company produces an important revenue stream and it all fits in with the recycling ethic today.

Global Warfare

Jun 29th
2010

What do you choose, a GPS unit or an app?

Smartphones and their nifty apps have permeated nearly every aspect of society. You can use them to do everything from buying groceries to monitoring your sleep patterns. So it was just a matter of time before CPS companies made their golf-course yardage-measuring software compatible with smartphones.
Unlike traditional stand-alone GPS devices, which cost €120.00 to €400.00 and have been on the market since 1999, a smartphone GPS app is cheaper – free to €25.00, and more convenient if you own an iPhone, BlackBerry, etc. But some tests revealed there is a trade-off in performance, which is why many companies have continued to improve their stand-alone devices.

For instance, the precision of any golf GPS device depends on its hardware (the antenna and receiver that can quickly read signals from satellites) and the quality of the maps loaded onto the device.
The hardware in a smartphone isn’t as powerful as that in the top hand-held GPS units, so apps aren’t as precise in measurements.
Sometimes the maps are questionable. GPS companies that make hand-held devices generally use high-quality, proprietary satellite imagery to ensure their maps are as accurate as possible.
Though battery life in a hand-held device can last for more than three rounds before needing a recharge, no smartphone tested lasted for an entire round.
The smartphones are plenty powerful for 99 per cent of their uses, but they’re not designed to offer the precision that golf requires. (Source: Golf World Magazine)