Archive for the ‘Golf Related’ Category

Golf Books #278 (Golf with the Devil)

Jun 20th
2017

Rolf Zeiler, a German born writer has dedicated this book to all golfers because golf is a tough devilish game. To survive it, he felt that all of us need some big laughs to ease the painful moments that this game definitely gives us.

Golf with the Devil is a book for the 60 million golf enthusiasts worldwide trying to master the game. It is a suitable gift purchase for all people wanting to buy a golf humor book for their golf-addicted friends. The book is a compilation of ten short stories evolving round a golfing mad Devil. Getting souls to hell is an easy task for the Devil these days. And like the human working population, he suffers from monotony.

Just for fun, the writer add an interview, sections of legal Implications in negotiating with the Devil, golf courses named after the Devil and a few jokes. So, the Devil in these tales uses golf, his hobby, to win a soul because it presents a more exciting challenge.

But it’s not that easy, as readers would discover, some golfers are smart enough to outwit the Devil while others fall prey. But wait, there’s more…

Golf Books #277 (Stableford: A Life in Golf, War and Medicine)

Jun 13th
2017

Known as the ‘Patron Saint of Club Golfers’ throughout the world, Dr Frank Barney Gorton Stableford is recognised as one of the most prominent figures in the history of golf.

Like the good doctor he was, Stableford introduced and developed a scoring system which greatly reduced the pain of bad play and increased the enjoyment of the game for golfers of all standards.

Beyond golf, his achievements as a man of ideals and many talents provide us with shining examples of how to contribute to the world in which we live and make a difference through personal commitment.

This fascinating book traces his family background from its industrial beginnings through the decades of tumultuous and peaceful times and his life in golf, medicine and war.

Publication date: June 5, 2017 (source)

Golf Books #276 (The Golfing Brain: Fast-Brain Golf)

May 23rd
2017

Golfers’ most essential tool is also their least understood tool: the brain.

Golfers are of course aware that they use their brain to swing a club, plot strategy, and estimate outcomes. But most golfers know very little about how distinct brain functions promote or inhibit a satisfying round of golf. They’re unaware that they can consciously shift modes to their benefit. They operate under the false assumption that the physical and mental aspects of golf are separate elements of the game.

Without an adequate understanding of the interplay of the brain and the rest of the body, golfers can spend thousands of hours on the practice tee and still have disappointing rounds. They can buy the latest high-tech equipment and take decades of lessons, and still find themselves grinding away, hole after hole.

Golf—even competitive golf—should be a pleasant experience. It should elicit our best selves, not our worst selves. This is the guiding principle of Fast-Brain Golf. The book’s author, James H. Grubbs, is a practicing psychiatrist, competitive golfer, and golfing-brain instructor. His interest in psychology and neuroscience, and his years of golf experience, inform this practical and innovative guide to better golf.

Fast-Brain Golf does not purport to reveal “secrets” of good golf—because, as the author insists, there are no golf “secrets.” There is only adequate understanding of brain functions as they apply to golf, ongoing stroke practice, and the willingness to enjoy every round, regardless of what’s at stake.

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Golfamily Album #119

May 20th
2017

Pacific Palisades, CA – February 18: K.J. Choi tees off on the 12th Hole during Round 3 of the Genesis Open at the Riviera Country Club Golf Course on February 18, 2017 in Pacific Palisades, CA. (Photo by Paul Mounce/Getty Images)

Golf Books #275 (Memoirs Of The Legendary Iron Man Of Saint Andrews)

May 16th
2017

With the Foreword written by Donald J. Trump, “Memoirs of the legendary Iron Man of St. Andrews” reads very much like an historical analysis of the birthplace of golf, yet most golf academics say it’s more than that, …much more.

The 93000-word memoirs entail a hauntingly in-depth account of the Iron Man’s 89 well-spent years of life and golf within the enchanted royal burgh of his birth, beginning mid-June of 1827, when at age six, he and his six year-old best chum, wee Tom Morris met “The Wizard of the North,” Sir Walter Scott, beneath St. Rules Tower in the graveyard amongst the ruins of St. Andrews Cathedral.

This historical novel provides a revealing look into the real history of 1800s Saint Andrews, Scotland and its golfers.

Publication date: January 22, 2017 (source)

Golfamily Album #118

May 13th
2017

Brandt Snedeker during the first round of the 2017 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 6, 2017 in Augusta, Georgia.

Golf Books #274 (Reflections on the Art of Golf)

May 9th
2017

After six years of turmoil caused by the illness and injury of the two people closest to me in my life, and the aftermath of dealing with their eventual deaths, I found myself in need of a place to live in order to spend what remained of my life. And as destiny would have it, I stumbled on a townhouse on the third hole of the golf course I had played the last five years, and immediately purchased it and moved in a week later. As hoped, the change in my environs pulled me out of the introverted world in which I lived, and propelled me into a new life in the only place of cheer left to me; the golf course.

Having completed the four novels in The Art and Artifacts of Adventure series I spent the last three years writing, concerning the adventures my companions and I survived on a lengthy archaeological expedition through Mexico and Central America in 1981, I needed a break of indeterminate length, until such time as I felt ready to begin another major project. But to keep my hand in the game as it were, out of the blue I resolved to write about the people I watch play past my porch when I am not myself playing golf.

In theory, this inconsequential task would help hone my observational skills on matters mundane, surreptitiously surveilled from my back porch not a stone’s throw from the tee on the third hole of the Littleton Golf and Tennis Club’s executive golf course. I would then use these observations to write and edit a chapter in a single sitting until it was publication ready, before emailing it to a dozen people to be read. I hoped this intensive exercise would drastically improve the composition quality of my first drafts, and concatenate the dozen rewrites I usually made into a single carefully composed edit, as if I wrote a daily column for a newspaper on a fixed deadline. But wait, there’s more…

Golf Books #273 (The Perfect Round: A walk in the rain)

May 2nd
2017

The story is about a golfer and his caddie. Their history goes way back — to middle and high school — when they first found companionship on the golf course. One was seeking friendship, the other was seeking a better score. They both succeeded. But their success came not without surprises. The story is about what you see and what you think you see. Sometimes the two are different.

This is true on the golf course as well as in life. In fact, most of what we learn on the golf course is also an important lesson for us off the golf course. The story is about friendship. Shakespeare once said it was misery that made strange bedfellows. Friendship does too. The strings tied by friendship are often long and the knots often tight. The story is about one round of golf. Eighteen holes. Many of the golf shots are good. Some are not. There are always mistakes. And as in life, it’s how you handle them that makes the difference.

Walter Hagan told us to get used to it: “I expect to make at least seven mistakes a round, therefore, when I make a bad shot, it’s just one of the seven.” Bobby Jones said, “Golf is the closest game to the game we call life.” A few years ago I would have scoffed. Today, I believe.

Publication date: March 27, 2017 (source)

 

Golfamily Album #117

Apr 29th
2017

PACIFIC PALISADES, CA – FEBRUARY 19: Luke Donald hits a tee shot during the third round of the Genesis Open at Riviera Country Club on February 19, 2017, in Pacific Palisades, CA (Photo by Adam Davis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Golf Books #272 (Unprecedented)

Apr 18th
2017
To mark the twentieth anniversary of his historic win at the 1997 Masters, Tiger Woods will for the first time reflect on the record-setting win both on and off the course.
In 1997, Tiger Woods was already among the most-watched and closely examined athletes in history. But it wasn’t until the Masters Tournament that his career would definitively change forever. Woods, then only 21, won the Masters by a historic 12 shots, which remains the widest margin of victory in the tournament’s history, making it an iconic moment for him and sports.
Now, 20 years later, Woods is ready to explore his history with the game, how it has changed over the years, and what it was like winning such an important event. With never-before-heard stories, this book will provide keen insight from one of the game’s all-time greats.
Publication date: March 23, 2017 (source)

About the Author

Tiger Woods, now 40 years old, has had an unprecedented career since becoming a professional golfer in the late summer of 1996. He has won 105 tournaments, 79 of those on the PGA TOUR, including the 1997, 2001, 2002, and 2005 Masters Tournaments, 1999, 2000, 2006, and 2007 PGA Championships, 2000, 2002, and 2008 U.S. Open Championships, and 2000, 2005, and 2006 British Open Championships. With his second Masters victory in 2001, Tiger became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time. In winning the 2000 British Open at St. Andrews, Woods became the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships and only the fifth ever to do so. Tiger also was the youngest Masters champion ever, at the age of 21 years, three months and 14 days, and was the first African-American or individual of Asian heritage to win a major championship.